new art collectors     Bob Heatly  
20 pieces by Bob Heatly
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£3100
Almost Three, Townscape 29
 
£1700
Butterfly Lady, Townscape 12
 
£1700
Butterfly, Townscape 22
 
£1700
Cigale's Also Play Chess, Fall in Provence 2
 
£1700
Gesalt, Twilight 6
 
£1700
Jaws, Twilight 10
 
£1700
Juggle, Five 4
 
£1250
Look at the Map. See the Sea. It is Flat and a Rec
 
£1250
Man is the Center of the Bermuda Triangle: Clearin
 
£1700
Matador, Townscape 20
 
£1700
Punch, Five 2
 
£1700
Shutters and Laundry, Townscape 17
 
£1700
Sting, Five 1
 
£3100
Street Jazz Townscape 30
 
£1250
Swimming in the Sky River, Summer Sun 1
 
£1250
The Argument Was Over Real Moon Walking, Cigarette
 
£1250
The Man Has Style, Summer Sun 2
 
£1250
The Next New World Will Be Different, Summer Sun 1
 
£1700
Thor's Hammer, Twilight 11
 
£1700
Village Green, Fall in Provence 8
 
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Bob Heatly Paintings
I taught basic design, architectural design, graduate design and design competition studios while teaching at one of the best universities for the study of architecture and was the mentor for over 150 National and International Student Design Competition winners. In December of 1999, I left architectural education and moved to Provence in Southern France to concentrate totally on my art. I have been painting seriously since 1985.
 
Education:
1967 Bachelor of Architecture at Oklahoma State University 1969 Masters of Architecture and Urban Design at University of Illinois 1971-1999 Professor of Architecture at University of Illinois, Texas A&M University, and Oklahoma State University 1985-1999 Numerous shows and exhibits in Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, New Mexico, and Nebraska 1992-1999 Houshangs Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Moved to France in 1999 to concentrate solely on my paintings.
 
Artist's Statement:
Layered abstractions of reality with a clock (evolution of a kinetic concept) My current work of "layered abstractions of reality with a clock" is as close as I get to all mind and meaning. I am trying to do paintings that become the focal point of their environment and change with distance and lighting to constantly intrigue and interest. Whether it be abstract slices of space in the Townscape Series, the interpretive abstractions of the Fall in Provence Series or the geometric abstracts of simple actions in the Five Series this approach has served me well. In 1988-92, I called this type of "layered abstractions of reality with a clock" painting concept that I am doing the Patmos series. Before that Vestiges or Island Vestiges . TOWNSCAPES has been my defining term since 2002. Another artist described it as contemporary digital cubism. Since I am beginning to use the same method to paint people, flowers, windows, etc., maybe I need a new name for what I do. The monologue that follows is an attempt to explain the background to the idea, influences on my thinking, the idea (what I am doing), why, and a little on how. My first introduction to the concept of serial vision. In 1967, while taking a course in Urban Design one of the required reading references was Townscapes by Gordon Cullen . Cullen described a way of looking at urban spaces he called “Serial Vision” which was illustrated with a series of strong drawings of the different views one has walking through a quality urban space that proved the value of many formal design principles. The map diagram tracing your path through an urban space combined with the sketches done from the path clearly illustrated why we remember those quality urban spaces. Not a single image but instead a moving or kinetic image memory. This book and in particular “serial vision” were extremely important to my development as an artist whether in the design of an urban space, a building, or a painting. I really do believe we see reality as a series of frozen images that helps us process the constant minute changes in our personal reality. Between 1961 and 1967 I was fortunate enough to be a student of Dale McKinney, Professor of Art at Oklahoma State University. He was one of the most creative people that I have ever known and his own work in kinetic art was well ahead of its time. You could not define him as just a sculptor, a painter or an inventor. Dale McKinney was an ARTIST and TEACHER. He introduced me to formal color theory and showed me how important it can be when used properly. The use of complimentary color to cause an edge to vibrate or seem to move on the canvas as one very simple example. He also used to ask us to look for compositions in our surroundings. He stressed really focusing in on very small areas of our environment (two stones touching a twig kind of scale). Design and composition was possible even if cropping was your only tool was a good lesson to learn. He is my strongest artistic influence by far. An appreciation for kinetic art was only one of the things he taught me. In 1980, I was teaching a graduate design course at the School of Architecture at Oklahoma State University and asked Dale to help me devise a basic design project to stimulate their creativity. The product of the project was a short movie to illustrate the effects of projected images on a rotating white sculpture of their design. We used a clock motor to provide the rotation. Amazing things happened. Images seemed to clip in and out as the sculpture rotated and the films that resulted were definitely more than a sum of their parts. The project and the graduate student results proved the value of basic design theories and resulted in sophisticated films with images seeming to come forward and then retreat only to be eclipsed by other design elements. Basic design truly is wasted on youth. I did not paint in any serious way between 1967-1985 as I concentrated on the art of architecture. I was both a practicing architect and a teacher at the architectural schools of the University of Illinois, Texas A&M, and Oklahoma State University. My personal design work in architectural practice might be best described as layered spaces with an implied ordering system organized around a strong concept or idea. Framing space and always being aware that people move through space were extremely important to me. Good architects sculpt space. The walls, etc. are just the tools one has to define the spatial sculpture. Again, I saw reality as a series of connected experiences. Good architects are also good business people, personable, etc. Architecture really is a business with all the paperwork and mundane grind that comes with the territory. The business side and the repetitive aspects of some architectural tasks led me to concentrate on teaching architectural design rather that architectural practice. Honestly, it was just more fun. Teaching architectural design allowed me to concentrate all of my energy on the creative aspects of design. I found that as a teacher juggling student designs and concepts in your head on a daily basis keeps your mind learning and open to new ideas. I learned a lot more about design and composition as a teacher than I ever learned in school or practice. I taught basic design, architectural design and design competition studios and was fortunate enough to be mentor for over 150 national and international student design competition winners, was awarded the 1997 ACSA Distinguished Professor, and the 1988 Outstanding Teacher for Oklahoma State University. Basic design for architects at the universities that I taught at are not that much different than a basic design course for artists. Good design starts with the abstract fundamentals of composition like figure-ground, geometry, order, proportion, rhythm, etc. Once again, I was fortunate to be able to teach with and learn from another great teacher. Robert Wright, a fellow Professor at both the University of Illinois and Oklahoma State University. He has got to be the most innovative teacher of basic design that has ever lived. The design projects he created are still copied and used at many other universities in the United States. One of the many things I learned from him was a genuine appreciation of Piet Mondrian. Grids and the strength of the 90 degree component as art not just structure. Also, the critical role figure-ground analysis plays in high quality compositions. He made me a better teacher and his influence has helped me become a better artist. He has been doing wonderful abstract collages using scraps of photographs for many years. What I do also appears as a collage of quasi real images. In fact, I try very hard to reinforce that thought to the viewer by stressing the division between different image depths. I have been more influenced by Bob than any other colleague. EVOLUTION OF A KINETIC CONCEPTT Here were many benefits to being a university professor. Not the least of which is time for your other creative interests. We got 3 months off each summer and a full semester every 7 years. In 1985, I spent 4 months traveling and drawing in Europe. This rekindled my interest in painting. I began to paint seriously upon my return. Jim Knight and I were renting a loft space downtown for our architectural studio/office (the Atelier). It was where I chose to paint. All my prior work had been done with oils. Because of the fumes connected with oils, I chose to use acrylics as a painting medium. First, I tried to use acrylics as I had used oils and did about 7 extremely loose abstract expressionist pieces. At the time, I felt that acrylics were ill suited to that kind of painting and decided to try to use acrylics in a hard edged totally opaque manner. I thought that was more appropriate for acrylics. Even though I have returned to painting hard edged and opaque, I don’t believe that any more. Layering works so well with acrylics you can do almost anything. Back to what I was painting. Hard edges made it easy for me to incorporate much of my experience as an architect and as an architectural educator. Light, layering and the resultant play of planned shadows was a major part of my architectural work. Geometry, proportion, order and concept. VESTIGE Series. 1985-86 Part of my current idea originated with this early series. At the time, I was interested in challenging a viewer’s perception of a flat rectangle hanging on a wall. I still am. I wanted to make the viewer believe the surface was not flat. Instead, you were intended to see a series of articulated planes suspended in air and whose color and form were defined and articulated by the sun’s rays passing through filters before hitting the planes. This interaction between man and nature was explored via my mental three dimensional constructs viewed under an intense light source and through rectangular filters of varying opaque and color qualities. The operative word was mental for these constructs as their interactions existed only in my mind. The vestige painting are those afterimages. Articulated planes of different depth are still major elements in the implementation of the idea. Emphasis on light is definitely still part of the idea. These paintings should be classified as representational art. They represented what I was seeing in my mind. Their abstract qualities came from the nature of the subject matter. ISLAND VESTIGE Series. 1987 Patmos and Santorini are two of the white islands of Greece. I thought it would be fun and challenging to recreate the ambiance and sense of place where most things are painted white using the minimal amount of realism. Where do you lose the sense of place? That edge or point was what I was trying to achieve. This transition between the Vestiges and Patmos Series was a group of paintings where different scaled images were mentally projected on articulated planes of different depths. The images were only visible in the shadows my carved planes cast on one another. The planes and grid reinforced the ninety degree geometry of the canvas. A whole rationale for proportion and rhythm independent of the images was developed. I am still doing that but with different ordering systems. Fragments of real images were introduced to give the viewer a puzzle to solve as well as generating paintings with visual depth and interest. Light created the color changes and only minimal architectural symbols and elements were required to capture the sense of place. My fascination with the subtle changes in warm and cold earth colors began with this series. PATMOS Series. 1988-92 Vestiges plus Island Vestiges led to the Patmos Series. I decided to increase the importance of the image and downplay the visual strength of the abstract ordering of the various planes. No negative space. The planes of the Vestige and Island Vestige Series remained but, the definition of the planes would be done without the use of light and shadows. Scale of the image was to be the only perceptual tool I would use. I chose images with a strong sense of perspective to reinforce the depth of the painting and then enlarged the image as the planes receded. The idea worked even better than I hoped. All of the paintings were done based upon street scenes of the Island of Patmos, Greece with the exception of Rio Tera Secondo (Venice, Italy), Ghost of the Queen (Queen Mary, the cruise ship anchored in L.A.), and Windows (Santa Fe, New Mexico). TOWNSCAPE Series. 2001-presentThe Townscapes series, by incorporating the elements of time and movement, illustrates the beauty and charm of the ordinary street scenes of the hill towns and villages that surround my studio. These kinetic images give the viewer a sense of "place". They are designed to change character as you view them from different distances. Real or at least quasi real from a distance to total abstractions on closer inspection. Light and the absence of light are major components in the success of these paintings. My paintings have varied between trying to be all heart to all mind with a little bit of heart always there. At the heart end, it is all about emotion, gesture, and attitude with the mind trying to throw in some tools to make it work. My current work of layered abstractions of reality with a clock is as close as I get to all mind and meaning. It is a strong conceptual approach. I am trying to do paintings that become the focal point of their environment and change with distance and lighting to constantly intrigue and interest. This is what I think that I am doing.
 
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