new art collectors     Lorenzo Belenguer  
7 pieces by Lorenzo Belenguer
This is page 1  of 1
 
 
Contact Lorenzo Belenguer at New Art Collectors   print  Print page view full biography  
 
1200
Grid V
 
950
Made in England
 
650
Mini-Grid IV
 
450
Mini-Object IV
 
450
Mini-Object XII
 
950
Object V
 
3000
Homage to Pollock II
 
    back to top
Lorenzo Belenguer Biography
I was born in Valencia in 1970. After graduating in economics in 1993, I realised that I needed a change of direction. In the search for this, I travelled and spent some time in Paris before coming to England, and eventually London.This was the setting where my career as an artist took shape; I began to participate in, then helped to mount and eventually ran exhibitions in unorthodox spaces, such as condemned buildings, derelict shops, an abandoned medical clinic and a lock-gate house. This gave me the freedom to develop my own artistic expression.
 
Education:
Education1993 BA Economics, University of Valencia
 
Single Exhibitions:
2008

TulloMarshallWarren, Chelsea, London

2007

The Gallery at Willesden Green, London

2006

Artwash, Oxford

2005

Museum of Reading
Kafka Klub, Zagreb, Croatia




 
Group Exhibitions:
2008

Skylark Gallery, Oxo Tower, London
The Orangerie, Holland Park, London
Mall Galleries, St James Park, London

2007

E:vent Gallery, Bethnal Green, London
The Stables Gallery, Willesden Green, London
Punk, Ada Street Gallery, London Fields, London
The Florence Trust, Islington, London
The Gallery at Willesden Green, London

2006

London County Hall
VTO Gallery, London
Iowa Biennial
Westminster Cathedral, London
Riverside museum at Blake’s Lock, Reading

2005

Hong Kong Artists’ Biennale
The Rogues Gallery, Reading
Remix Festival, Reading

2004

Para/Site Art Space, Hong Kong
The Arundel Trust, London
Brighton Artists Gallery, Brighton

 
Artist's Statement:
Recycling is the basis of much of my work. I am intrigued by the potential for reclaiming discarded objects and ascribing to them another function, another role, starting a new history on the remains of the old.My method of creation is a constant investigation, a search for objects whose function has been lost and onto which the creative process can attach itself and explode. It is an adventure with a specific beginning but without a stipulated end. I continue and continue until an image of what may be hidden in the discarded object takes form in my imagination. I can find objects in one piece or assemble them from a variety of parts and then transform into a new entity.“Lorenzo Belenguer's work straddles the realms of sculpture, painting and drawing. In one area of his practice, he transforms metal objects into sculptures that evolve from the visual rhetoric of Minimalism and double as ‘canvases’.Belenguer is like a hunter who trawls the city for found objects, sometimes sourced as locally as the back garden of the studios' church. The work is then dictated by his discoveries, which include steel grids, a mattress reduced to its mesh of springs, and blacksmiths' tools. These he reads as masculine objects. He intervenes with these structures by oxidising the metal elements in salt water or acids and dabbing them with paint of primary colours. This transforms how the objects are read, emphasising the points at which layers of meaning converge.For example, the artist paints the cone of an old anvil a vivid yellow, thereby morphing it into phallic form. In "Homage to Pollock" a spring mattress becomes a three-dimensional, and strangely fluid, abstract canvas.Belenguer’s work also encompasses drawing, which he interprets as the more "feminine" side of his practice. For an installation he made at the Florence Trust, he drew repeated simple portraits of a female face, which he distressed by placing the sheets of paper into water contaminated with rusted iron. These drawings fill the walls of a niche space he has built, no bigger than a telephone kiosk, from floor to ceiling. A layer of chicken wire covers them, so the niche resembles a cage, perhaps a prison cell. Alongside the niche, a metal basket holds a stack of additional, still-to-be-used, drawings.The artist describes his female figure as a generic everywoman wearing a head covering. She might be read as being Muslim or the Virgin Mary, as a woman of the Renaissance, the Victorian age or of post-war Britain. Belenguer says she is emblematic of society’s increasingly conservative, and coercive, policies toward women.” (review by Dr Kathy Battista, King’s College London, for the Florence Trust, 2007)